Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An Athenian officer who superintended the gymnasia and paid for the oil and other necessities.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. An Athenian officer who superintended the gymnasia, and provided the oil and other necessaries at his own expense.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In Greek history, a magistrate who superintended the gymnasia and certain public games.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Latin gymnasiarchus, from Ancient Greek.

Examples

  • If e is to stand, transl. “than they get whilst supplied by the gymnasiarch in the torch race,” or

    Ways and Means

  • At Athens the the leitourgia was the public service performed by the wealthier citizens at their own expense, such as the office of gymnasiarch, who superintended the gymnasium, that of choregus, who paid the singers of a chorus in the theatre, that of the hestiator, who gave a banquet to his tribe, of the trierarchus, who provided a warship for the state.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 9: Laprade-Mass Liturgy

  • Out in the sand, near the statue of Hermes (the patron god of gymnasia) is a dignified and self-conscious looking man in a purple edged chiton -- the gymnasiarch, the official manager of the Academy.

    A Day in Old Athens; a Picture of Athenian Life

  • The gymnasiarch stands watchfully by, swinging his cane to smite painfully whoever, in over eagerness, breaks away before the signal.

    A Day in Old Athens; a Picture of Athenian Life

  • On the same principle, in the case of the coregia, (29) the gymnasiarchy, and the trierarchy, the fact is recognised that it is the rich man who trains the chorus, and the People for whom the chorus is trained; it is the rich man who is trierarch or gymnasiarch, and the People that profits by their labours.

    Polity Athenians and Lacedaemonians

  • Council, the gymnasiarch, and I know not how many others.

    Cleopatra — Volume 09

  • On the same principle, in the case of the coregia,29 the gymnasiarchy, and the trierarchy, the fact is recognised that it is the rich man who trains the chorus, and the People for whom the chorus is trained; it is the rich man who is trierarch or gymnasiarch, and the People that profits by their labours. 30 In fact, what the People looks upon as its right is to pocket the money. 31 To sing and run and dance and man the vessels is well enough, but only in order that the

    The Polity of the Athenians and the Lacedaemonians

  • Demetrius,. the gymnasiarch, saw that it was pulled down, for it was his office.

    The two last pleadings of Marcus Tullius Cicero against Caius Verres;

  • It registers a decree of the repuWic of Gela to remunerate the good conduct of Herac - lides the gymnasiarch, with a crown of olive.

    The two last pleadings of Marcus Tullius Cicero against Caius Verres;

  • _gymnasiarch_, the sub-director or _gymnast_, and the subordinates.

    Outlines of Greek and Roman Medicine

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