Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of or pertaining to a habenula

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • In anatomy, pertaining to the habenula or habena: as, the habenular ganglion.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Fibers enter it from the stalk of the pineal body, and others, forming what is termed the habenular commissure, pass across the middle line to the corresponding ganglion of the opposite side.

    IX. Neurology. 4c. The Fore-brain or Prosencephalon

  • The ventral lamina is continuous with the posterior commissure; the dorsal lamina is continuous with the habenular commissure and divides into two strands the medullary striæ, which run forward, one on either side, along the junction of the medial and upper surfaces of the thalamus to blend in front with the columns of the fornix.

    IX. Neurology. 4c. The Fore-brain or Prosencephalon

  • These fibers of the medullary stria end for the most part in the habenular nucleus of the same side, some, however, cross in the habenular commissure (dorsal part of the posterior commissure) to the habenular nucleus of the opposite side.

    IX. Neurology. 4e. Composition and Central Connections of the Spinal Nerves

  • A few fibers of the medullary stria are said to pass by the habenular nucleus to the roof of the mid-brain, especially the superior colliculus, while a few others come into relation with the posterior longitudinal bundle and association tracts of the mesencephalon.

    IX. Neurology. 4e. Composition and Central Connections of the Spinal Nerves

  • As the fornix passes the anterior end of the thalamus a few fibers are given off to the stria medullaris of the thalamus and turn back in the stria to the habenular ganglion of the same and the opposite side, having probably the same relation that the reflex fibers have which arise from the primary centers and course in the stria medullaries of the thalamus.

    IX. Neurology. 4e. Composition and Central Connections of the Spinal Nerves

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