Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of hackberry.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • There was no timber along our route today except small hackberries in the valleys and scrubby mesquite on the prairies.

    EMPIRE OF THE SUMMER MOON

  • Then, I exacerbated the problem when I chopped down every single “trash tree” mostly hackberries and lugustrums so that all the little fruit trees I planted would get more sunlight.

    Growing Grass

  • Live oaks and hackberries are dominant canopy species on many of the ridges, with an understory of palmetto and prickly pear cactus.

    Ecoregions of Louisiana (EPA)

  • This formation is fossiliferous and mammals, turtles, snails, and hackberries are just a few of the remains that have been found in these layers.

    Archive 2006-10-01

  • But growing up we had two very large hackberries in our backyard.

    Plant It And They Will Come « Fairegarden

  • Smaller trees are completely covered with climbing moss while the ground is covered with salal, deer fern and hackberries along with tiny toadstools to gigantic brown, yellow and purple mushrooms, all being munched by banana and freaking gigantic black slugs you step on this sucker, and he is taking your shoe with him for pissing him off.

    Carmanah: If you go into the woods today....

  • There were many wild fruits, especially hackberries, which Christine thought may have been used to make some sort of juice or possibly even an early fermented wine.

    The Goddess and the Bull

  • In these sections, which were taken from an area of the building near a hearth or oven, Wendy was able to identify charred fragments of cereals, grasses, and hackberries as well as traces of animal dung that had been used as fuel, all of which were typical remains of everyday living in the Neolithic.

    The Goddess and the Bull

  • The first phase, about 11,500 to 11,000 years ago, was marked by findings of fruit stones and seeds of hackberries, plums, and pears, along with wild einkorn wheat and wild rye.

    The Goddess and the Bull

  • This regime was complemented with an assortment of wild fruits and nuts—including hackberries, wild almonds, pistachios, plums, and acorns—as well as tubers from the club-rush plant.

    The Goddess and the Bull

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