Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of haft.
  • v. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of haft.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Besides these (which are all good and substantiall commodities) they haue diuers other of smaller accompt, that are naturall and proper to that countrey: as the fish tooth (which they call Ribazuba) which is vsed both among themselues, and the Persians and Bougharians that fetch it from thence for beads, kniues, and sword hafts of Noblemen and gentlemen, and for diuers other vses.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation — Volume 04

  • (which are all good and substantiall commodities) they haue diuers other of smaller accompt, that are naturall and proper to that countrey: as the fish tooth (which they call Ribazuba) which is vsed both among themselues, and the Persians and Bougharians that fetch it from thence for beads, kniues, and sword hafts of Noblemen and gentlemen, and for diuers other vses.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

  • Ai hafts tu maiks mai noys awn ICHC tudae becuz IRL is wirking in teh libraree!

    Hard work pays off - Lolcats 'n' Funny Pictures of Cats - I Can Has Cheezburger?

  • And herself, swifter than the flash of an eye or the hafts of the sun, when it rises upwards from a far-distant land, hastened swiftly through the sea, until she reached the Aeaean beach of the

    The Argonautica

  • She flared steel, Pushing powerfully against the rings of metal wrapped loosely around the arrowheads 'broken hafts.

    Mistborn

  • His Push ripped the unattached rings free from the hafts, shooting the bits of metal backward.

    Mistborn

  • A slight movement of the ice round the ship caused the rudder to become dangerously jammed on the 21st, and we had to cut away the ice with ice – chisels, heavy pieces of iron with 6 – ft. wooden hafts.

    South: the story of Shackleton’s last expedition 1914–1917

  • "Branches too light for spear-hafts, and creepers no thicker than cords," he remarked, indicating the foliage about the crag.

    The Conquering Sword of Conan

  • At the time when Europeans first arrived, the Tasmanians had no metalworking skills, no stone tools with ground edges or wooden hafts, no wooden bowls, as the mainlanders did.

    The Song of The Dodo

  • More gestures and jabs with reversed spear hafts commanded them to make haste.

    The Falcons of Montabard

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