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Examples

  • Meanwhile, the country will have to import no less than 10 million tons of wheat in 2011 at about $3.3 billion if grain prices don’t continue to rise to keep people at least half-fed.

    Pepe Escobar: So Many Ways to Strut Your Democratic Stuff in a New World

  • Meanwhile, the country will have to import no less than 10 million tons of wheat in 2011 at about $3.3 billion if grain prices don’t continue to rise to keep people at least half-fed.

    Pepe Escobar: So Many Ways to Strut Your Democratic Stuff in a New World

  • I remember the quiet way she stood up from the table one year, casually, during the half-fed moments before dessert - my cousins making new jokes about Nixon's nose, wiping their chins.

    Fake Pearls

  • Still, the same writer could see a “certain and unjustified cruelty” in forcing “poor half-fed fellows” to work eight to ten hours in such heat.

    The Path Between the Seas

  • Still, the same writer could see a “certain and unjustified cruelty” in forcing “poor half-fed fellows” to work eight to ten hours in such heat.

    The Path Between the Seas

  • Here also was an establishment for distributing food, and a crowd of poor half-fed wretches were there to meet them.

    Castle Richmond

  • World events today show that a free democratic world cannot exist half-fed and half-starved, and once again we are much concerned with the maintenance of a free democratic world.

    Canada and the Colombo Plan

  • _ -- A dish of yellow-looking bacalhao, the worst supposable specimen of our saltings in Newfoundland; a platter of compact, black, greasy, dirty-looking rice; a pound, if so much, of poor half-fed meat;

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 20, No. 560, August 4, 1832

  • The children were constantly cross, and so much of the mother's time was consumed in caring for these irritable, half-fed babies, that the home was disheveled, the meals never ready, the husband's home-coming was a dreaded occurrence, and he, endeavoring to seek rest and relaxation, usually sought for it in the poolroom or the saloon, with the usual climax which never fails to bring the time-honored results of debauch -- despair and desertion.

    The Mother and Her Child

  • It was his custom at the conclusion of his drunken revels to parade his weak, ill, half-fed prisoners before his guests, as fine specimens of the rebel army.

    The Story of Manhattan

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