Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of harlotry.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In subsequent passages the Nahum Pesher quotes additional verses from Nahum to describe a change in government and the reign of a woman: “Because of the countless fornications of the prostitute, the alluring mistress of sorcery, who ensnares nations with her harlotries and people with her sorcery” Nahum 3:4.

    Archive 2008-06-01

  • Well then, I fancy that he will live amid revelries and harlotries, and love will be the lord and master of the house.

    The Republic by Plato ; translated by Benjamin Jowett

  • Thee into a far country, to spend it upon harlotries.

    The Confessions

  • The le before zenunim is a le of relation (K.S. 105) -- "she is pregnant relative to her harlotries," in which plural lies an exaggeration.

    Exposition of Genesis: Volume 1

  • So then it served not to my use, but rather to my perdition, since I went about to get so good a portion of my substance into my own keeping; and I kept not my strength for Thee, but wandered from Thee into a far country, to spend it upon harlotries.

    The Fourth Book

  • Nahum alludes, where he denounces Nineveh as a "well-favored harlot," the multitude of whose harlotries was notorious.

    The Seven Great Monarchies Of The Ancient Eastern World, Vol 2. (of 7): Assyria The History, Geography, And Antiquities Of Chaldaea, Assyria, Babylon, Media, Persia, Parthia, And Sassanian or New Persian Empire; With Maps and Illustrations.

  • I fancy that he will live amid revelries and harlotries, and love will be the lord and master of the house.

    The Republic

  • Madame d'Armagnac was ashamed of having done all these harlotries to the profit of death, and of betraying Savoisy the better to save him; but this slight remorse was lame as the greater, and came tardily.

    Droll Stories — Volume 1

  • Stomach-turned at the fat niggers dressed up like Turks and Algerians and made to lend an "air" to the haunt of the nocturnal belly dancers in the Rue Pigalle, sickened at the stupid lewdities of the Rue Biot, disgusted at the brassy harlotries of the

    Europe After 8:15

  • The hysterics of the eponymous hero and the harlotries of the eponymous heroine remove both alike beyond the outer pale of all rational and manly sympathy; though Shakespeare's self may never have exceeded or equalled for subtle and accurate and bitter fidelity the study here given of an utterly light woman, shallow and loose and dissolute in the most literal sense, rather than perverse or unkindly or unclean; and though Keats alone in his most perfect mood of lyric passion and burning vision as full of fragrance as of flame could have matched and all but overmatched those passages in which the rapture of Troilus makes pale and humble by comparison the keenest raptures of

    A Study of Shakespeare

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.