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Etymologies

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Examples

  • “O conquerour of Brutes Albyon,” he added, “which that by lyne and free eleccion been verray kyng, this song to yow I sende, and ye, that mowen alle oure harmes amende, have mynde upon my supplicacion.”

    A Complaint to His Purse

  • Daughter answered the good old man, we can gladly give you entertainement here, for this night, in such poore manner as you see: but let mee tell you withall, that up and downe these woods (as well by night as day) walke companies of all conditions, and rather enemies then friends, who do us many greevous displeasures and harmes.

    The Decameron

  • Out of which saucy and ambitious presumption, many mighty harmes have already had beginning, and more are like to ensue uppon such boldnesse, because it is the ground of all evils.

    The Decameron

  • Such harmes as thou wishest, such thou dreamest of.

    The Decameron

  • True it is Wife (quoth he) that little credit should bee given to dreames: neverthelesse, when they deliver advertisement of harmes to ensue, there is nothing lost by shunning and avoiding them.

    The Decameron

  • Straightly charging and commanding all her Maiesties subiects in those parts, as they will auoid her Highnesse displeasure and their owne harmes, to honour his authoritie, and haue due respect vnto the same, aiding and assisting him there with their persons and goods in any cause requisit to her Maiesties good seruice and commoditie of her dominions.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

  • In that cytee was Dyne Jacobes doughter ravysscht; for whom hire bretheren slowen many persones, and diden many harmes to the cytee.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

  • He that compard mans bodie to an hoast, Sayd that the hands were scouts, discouering harmes, The feete were horsemen, thundring on the coast, The brest, and stomacke, footmen, huge in swarmes.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

  • Yet all in vaine, all works not _Grinuils_ harmes; Which seene, shee smiles, and yet with rage imbost5 Saith to her selfe, since men are all too weake, Behold a goddesse shall thy lifes twine breake.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

  • _Grinuile_ would neuer yeild, Able his power stoode like vnnumbred swarmes, Yet daring not on stricter tearmes to build, He offers all what may alay their harmes Safetie of liues, nor any thrall to weild, Free from the Gallie, prisonment, or paine, And safe returne vnto their soyle againe

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

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