Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of haste.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Over the mountains, the Bard, as directed by Sir Leoline, "hastes" with his disciple; but in consequence of one of those inundations supposed to be common to this country, the spot only where the castle once stood is discovered, -- the edifice itself being washed away.

    The Life of Samuel Taylor Coleridge 1838

  • “I do not think a prudent one will ever aim too high a cockroach seldom whips a dog and seldom should he try and should a locust take a vow to eat a pyramid he likely would wear out his teeth before he ever did i do not think the prudent one hastes to initiate a sequence of events which he lacks power to terminate”

    Blagojevich, the Iambic Anglophile - The Lede Blog - NYTimes.com

  • Oh! happy that votary, when from the hurrying revel-rout he sinks to earth, in his holy robe of fawnskin, chasing the goat to drink its blood, a banquet sweet of flesh uncooked, as he hastes to Phrygia's or to Libya's hills; while in the van the Bromian god exults with cries of Evoe.

    The Bacchantes

  • When Peter Peebles was removed from this memorable consultation, under the care of an able-bodied Celt, my father hastily bundled up the papers, as a showman, whose exhibition has miscarried, hastes to remove his booth.

    Redgauntlet

  •         Crosses anon wide ways populous, hastes to the street;

    Poems and Fragments

  • As she rapidly hastes to the green grove of myrtle;

    The Complete Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley

  • Now he hears another's footstep soft before him in the dark And he hastes to lay an ambush while the nightblade seeks his mark.

    Magic's Price

  • And bright-eyed Freedom hastes from Western shores

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 10, No. 270, August 25, 1827

  • Hearing his shout, Duke Naimes hastes up, and brings

    La Chanson de Roland : Translated from the Seventh Edition of Léon Gautier

  • It is the quiet, sane, constant work of the Spirit in and upon our spirit, that never hastes and never tires: which gives me comfort for you, for myself, for all of us.

    Letters to His Friends

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