health and safety love

health and safety

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Is a low-level possession bust really worth the health and safety of my tomatoes, my still-delicate beets, or most important, my potatoes?

    MY EMPIRE OF DIRT

  • At a recent meeting, the teenagers settled on an agenda of graffiti clean-ups, a Sunday meeting to educate SRO residents in health and safety issues, and a tenant-services event, which Tim Ho helped to launch in 2002 to “sort of bridge the generation gap.”

    American Chinatown

  • From 2003 to 2005, prisoners processed more than 120 million pounds of e-waste, in processes plagued with health and safety violations—often no protective gear was provided, although smashing the electronics released lead, cadmium, and other hazards.67 Federal Prison Industries aka UNICOR, which manages prison e-waste processing, is now the focus of a Department of Justice investigation for the toxic exposures prisoners suffer.

    THE STORY OF STUFF

  • Page and David Sylvain of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health report on the health and safety investigation of the Federal Prison Industries (UNICOR) electronics recycling program at Federal Bureau of Prisons institutions in Ohio, Texas, and California in a July 16, 2008, letter to Randall Humm, investigative counsel, U.S. Department of Justice (peer.org/docs/doj/08_28_7_ elkton_prison_niosh_report.pdf).

    THE STORY OF STUFF

  • While the investigation is ongoing, an interim report conducted by NIOSH National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health for the investigation confirmed that e-waste recycling had been taking place without adequate worker health and safety protection.68 Meanwhile, the practice continues.69

    THE STORY OF STUFF

  • Almost half a century after Silent Spring, we now have an Environmental Protection Agency that is charged with protecting the health and safety of both consumers and agricultural workers by regulating pesticides and fumigants.

    Michael Brune: Rachel's Kids

  • Capital costs for building incinerators in industrialized countries often run to $500 million—a 2009 proposal for one in Maryland came to $527 million.101 Meanwhile, their counterparts in developing countries generally cost between $13,000 and $700,000, which tells us something about double standards102; most of the incinerators built in poorer countries would never meet the standards set by U.S. or European health and safety laws, as inadequate as those laws still are.

    THE STORY OF STUFF

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