Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. heathendom

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Heathendom.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See heathenness.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • My object, indeed, in the introduction of the Danish Vala especially, has been perhaps as much addressed to the reason as to the fancy, in showing what large, if dim, remains of the ancient "heathenesse" still kept their ground on the Saxon soil, contending with and contrasting the monkish superstitions, by which they were ultimately replaced.

    Harold : the Last of the Saxon Kings — Volume 01

  • “But, my father,” said Catharine, “even for these opinions men term you a Lollard and a Wickliffite, and say it is your desire to destroy churches and cloisters, and restore the religion of heathenesse.”

    The Fair Maid of Perth

  • I thought that rending the bloody veil from my horrible fate could make thy proud heart stoop to the discipline of the church, I could find in my heart to tell thee a tale, which I have hitherto kept gnawing at my vitals in concealment, like the self-devoted youth of heathenesse.

    The Talisman

  • --- But to this piece of learned heathenesse --- say'st thou the Scot met him in the desert? ''

    The Talisman

  • "It belongs to the old days of heathenesse; before the Welsh were conquered by the Romans, perhaps before our Blessed Lord came into the world, these stones were placed as you now see them," replied Father

    Edwy the Fair or the First Chronicle of Aescendune

  • He was born in heathenesse, and his original name was Vojk: he was the first kiraly, or king of the Magyars.

    The Romany Rye

  • Morgante has two brothers, both of them giants, and in the first canto of the poem, Morgante is represented with his brothers as carrying on a feud with the abbot and monks of a certain convent, built upon the confines of heathenesse; the giants being in the habit of flinging down stones, or rather huge rocks, on the convent.

    The Romany Rye

  • Morgante has two brothers, both of them giants, and, in the first canto of the poem, Morgante is represented with his brothers as carrying on a feud with the abbot and monks of a certain convent, built upon the confines of heathenesse; the giants being in the habit of flinging down stones, or rather huge rocks, on the convent.

    The Romany Rye A Sequel to 'Lavengro'

  • Often in the good old days before the Monk-king reigned, kings and ealdermen had thus gone forth a-maying; but these merriments, savouring of heathenesse, that good prince misliked: nevertheless the song was as blithe, and the boughs were as green, as if king and ealderman had walked in the train.

    Harold : the Last of the Saxon Kings — Volume 01

  • "But, my father," said Catharine, "even for these opinions men term you a Lollard and a Wickliffite, and say it is your desire to destroy churches and cloisters, and restore the religion of heathenesse."

    The Fair Maid of Perth St. Valentine's Day

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