Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A school formerly kept beside a hedge, or in the open air, in Ireland; a poor, mean school.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • There was once a fairy who created the fields and forests expressly for those in love, — in that eternal hedge-school of lovers, which is forever beginning anew, and which will last as long as there are hedges and scholars.

    Les Miserables

  • Look at that B, and that G; their formae formativae never were begotten in a hedge-school.

    Westward Ho!

  • When he was old enough John ran barefoot with his brothers to the hedge-school, then the sole means of instruction for Catholic peasant children, who on fine days conned their lessons in a dry ditch under a hedge, and in wet weather were gathered into a rough barn.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 9: Laprade-Mass Liturgy

  • The teacher, the product of a local hedge-school and of a Munster classical school, or perhaps an ex-student of Maynooth, had first been employed as a tutor in some farmer's family.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 8: Infamy-Lapparent

  • The children of the poor, avoiding the Protestant schools, met in the open air, with only some friendly hedge to protect them from the blast; but they met in fear and trembling, for the hedge-school and its master were proscribed.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 8: Infamy-Lapparent

  • Ireland still swarming with beggars who marched about in families subsisting chiefly on the charity of the poor; Ireland of which the hedge-school was plainly to him the most characteristic institution.

    Irish Books and Irish People

  • He was educated at a hedge-school, and on coming to man's estate, obtained a situation as steward to a neighbouring landowner.

    Little Memoirs of the Nineteenth Century

  • Cricket is the national game among the schoolboys of the Punjab, from the naked hedge-school children, who use an old kerosene-tin for wicket, to the B. A.'s of the University, who compete for the Championship belt.

    Life's Handicap

  • Cricket is the national game among the school-boys of the Punjab, from the naked hedge-school children, who use an old kerosine-tin for wicket, to the B. A.'s of the University, who compete for the

    The Kipling Reader Selections from the Books of Rudyard Kipling

  • He says that Diarmid was killed by the druids, who put a burning shirt on him, -- a fragment of mythology that may connect Diarmid with the legend of Hercules, if it is not due to the 'learning' in some hedge-school master's ballad.

    The Aran Islands

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