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Examples

  • He was essentially the simple ancient man, the farmer and landholder; he would have been content to watch the seasons come and go, and his cattle increase, until the limit of age; he would have been content at any time to die, if he could have left the estates undiminished to an heir-male of his ancestors, that duty standing first in his instinctive calendar.

    Lay Morals

  • From this remote fountain he pretended to have come, following the acknowledged stream until he reached Benjamin, the last heir-male of the body of the first earl, and, diverting the current to heirs-female in the person of Hannah,

    Celebrated Claimants from Perkin Warbeck to Arthur Orton

  • Alexander, he procured himself to be served "lawful and nearest heir-male in general of the body of the said Hannah Alexander," before the bailies of Canongate, 1826.

    Celebrated Claimants from Perkin Warbeck to Arthur Orton

  • John dying six years later was succeeded by Walter Butler, a first cousin, whose son John, heir-male of the line of Ormonde, became earl of Ormonde and Ossory and

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 4 "Bulgaria" to "Calgary"

  • Claim for William Maxwell, Esq. of Carruchan, who served heir-male in general of Robert, Fourth Earl of Nithisdale.

    Memoirs of the Jacobites of 1715 and 1745 Volume III.

  • Percys of Northumberland; and that he did verily believe that the claimant was cousin and next heir-male to Jocelyn, late Earl of

    Celebrated Claimants from Perkin Warbeck to Arthur Orton

  • ‘Aye, but, ’ said the parish-clerk, ‘Factor Glossin wants to get rid of the auld Laird, and drive on the sale, for fear the heir-male should cast up upon them; for I have heard say, if there was an heir-male, they couldna sell the estate for auld Ellangowan’s debt.

    Chapter XI

  • ‘Aye did he, gudewife, and the estate’s sell’d by the same token; for they said they couldna have sell’d it, if there had been an heir-male.

    Chapter XXII

  • Glossin was then indigent, and greatly in debt, but he was already possessed of Mr. Bertram’s ear, and, aware of the facility of his disposition, he saw no difficulty in enriching himself at his expense, provided the heir-male were removed; in which case the estate became the unlimited property of the weak and prodigal father.

    Chapter XXXIII

  • "Ay, but," said the parish clerk, "Factor Glossin wants to get rid of the auld laird, and drive on the sale, for fear the heir-male should cast up; for if there's an heir-male, they canna sell the estate for auld Ellangowan's debt."

    The World's Greatest Books — Volume 07 — Fiction

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