Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of or pertaining to both the liver and the stomach

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. See gastrohepatic.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • In anatomy, relating to or connected with both the liver and the stomach: as, the hepatogastric omentum or epiploön.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

hepato- +‎ gastric

Examples

  • The portion of the lesser omentum extending between the liver and stomach is termed the hepatogastric ligament, while that between the liver and duodenum is the hepatoduodenal ligament.

    XI. Splanchnology. 2e. The Abdomen

  • The liver is also attached to the lesser curvature of the stomach by the hepatogastric and to the duodenum by the hepatoduodenal ligament (see page 1157).

    XI. Splanchnology. 2i. The Liver

  • The lesser curvature gives attachment to the two layers of the hepatogastric ligament, and between these two layers are the left gastric artery and the right gastric branch of the hepatic artery.

    XI. Splanchnology. 1F. The Stomach

  • The apex of the triangular bare area corresponds with the point of meeting of the two layers of the coronary ligament, its base with the fossa for the inferior vena cava. (b) It covers the lower surface of the quadrate lobe, the under and lateral surfaces of the gall-bladder, and the under surface and posterior border of the left lobe; it is then reflected from the upper surface of the left lobe to the diaphragm as the inferior layer of the left triangular ligament, and from the porta of the liver and the fossa for the ductus venosus to the lesser curvature of the stomach and the first 2.5 cm. of the duodenum as the anterior layer of the hepatogastric and hepatoduodenal ligaments, which together constitute the lesser omentum.

    XI. Splanchnology. 2e. The Abdomen

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