Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of, or relating to heterogenesis
  • adj. Of a disease produced by infection from outside the body

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Relating to heterogenesis.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Pertaining to or of the nature of heterogenesis, in any sense.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Professor Bastian, in considering the heterogenetic phenomena of "living matter," is obliged to fall back, near the end of his great work, on "the countless myriads of living units which have been evolved (?) in the different ages of the world's history."

    Life: Its True Genesis

  • This shows that its author believed in the possibility of the "superior organic forms," like the mastodon, megatherium, etc. from the "heterogenetic elements" -- those undergoing every conceivable change -- as well as the "inferior forms."

    Life: Its True Genesis

  • But how his "sum-total of external conditions," acting upon _dead_ matter, can "engender" _living_ matter, is one of those "related heterogenetic phenomena" which he does not condescend to explain.

    Life: Its True Genesis

  • If the species originated by descent from the most closely related lower species, and under certain circumstances also from species of the same rank, and even by degeneration from the next higher, it must have occurred in one of two ways: either by leaps -- called by naturalists "metamorphosis of germs" or "heterogenetic conception" -- or by a succession of imperceptibly small alterations of the individuals from generation to generation.

    The Theories of Darwin and Their Relation to Philosophy, Religion, and Morality

  • The real causes of such a heterogenetic generation, if it took place at all, have not yet been found; therefore we have to treat only of the abstract possibilities of its conceivableness.

    The Theories of Darwin and Their Relation to Philosophy, Religion, and Morality

  • So the reasons for and against the evolution theory almost balance one another; and it is not improbable that the hypothesis of an origin of species through development will have to share its authority with the hypothesis of a descent of species through heterogenetic generation, as well as with the hypothesis of a primitive generation of lower organisms, still repeating itself at a later time.

    The Theories of Darwin and Their Relation to Philosophy, Religion, and Morality

  • Besides, it is not only possible, but even probable, that both theories -- that of heterogenetic generation and that of gradual development -- may have to share with one another in the explanation of the origin of species; and even that, especially for the lowest species and for the beginnings of the main types, primitive generation also has its share in the establishment of the paternity.

    The Theories of Darwin and Their Relation to Philosophy, Religion, and Morality

  • Thus for the origination of {88} groups lying nearer together, we have the evolution theory; for the other groups, and especially for the origination of types where no transitions to other types can be traced, the theory of the heterogenetic or primitive generation recommends itself; and both theories thus far are of a purely hypothetical nature.

    The Theories of Darwin and Their Relation to Philosophy, Religion, and Morality

  • For even in case of its failure, a descent of one species from another through heterogenetic generation is certainly very possible.

    The Theories of Darwin and Their Relation to Philosophy, Religion, and Morality

  • Among them we find also scientists who answer the question in the sense of a new-modeling of the species, of a heterogenetic generation, and of a metamorphosis of germs.

    The Theories of Darwin and Their Relation to Philosophy, Religion, and Morality

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