Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Alternative spelling of hickory.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Ill-natured.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • When he had done this, he went to the forest near them, cut down a young pine-tree, dug up a root of the hemlock, took a spruce cone, an oak acorn, a hickery nut, and a birch-leaf, and laid them all in the fire which the Nanticoke had kindled.

    Traditions of the North American Indians, Vol. 2 (of 3)

  • [11] Julia Mannering reminds me a little of Julia Townsend: and if this be doubtful, the connection of Jerry's "Old madam gave me some higry-pigry" and Cuddie's "the leddy cured me with some hickery-pickery" is not.

    The English Novel

  • We put hickery nuts in our mouths so our voices would sound different, so he wouldn't know us, and was telling the other boys about what a time we had cutting up the last man we bought.

    Peck's Compendium of Fun

  • I ne’er gat ony gude by his doctrine, as ye ca’t, but a sour fit o’ the batts wi’ sitting amang the wat moss-hags for four hours at a yoking, and the leddy cured me wi’ some hickery-pickery; mair by token, an she had kend how I came by the disorder, she wadna hae been in sic a hurry to mend it.”

    Old Mortality

  • Another form is inkie-pinkie [perhaps the same as hickery - pickery, a purgative, originally a corruption of Latin (and

    Willie Buckthorne Had a Cow

  • I ne'er gat ony gude by his doctrine, as ye ca't, but a sour fit o 'the batts wi' sitting amang the wat moss-hags for four hours at a yoking, and the leddy cured me wi 'some hickery-pickery; mair by token, an she had kend how I came by the disorder, she wadna hae been in sic a hurry to mend it. "

    Old Mortality, Complete

  • The trees are much 'the fame with thofe in Virginia, and by their dif - ferent fpecies the quality of the foil is eaftly difco* vered; for the grounds which bear the oak, the walnut, and the hickery, are extremely fertile: they confift of a dark fand, intermixed with loam; and as here all the land abounds with nitre, it is a long time before it is exhaufted -, the planters never ufing any manure.

    A general history of the British empire in America : containing an historical, political, and commercial view of the English settlements ; including all the countries in North-America, and the West-Indies, ceded by the peace of Paris

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