Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Inflated; boastful.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Though little apt himself to use high-swelling words, it did not annoy him to hear others sounding their own praises, which he regarded as a harmless weakness, the pledge at least of high endeavour99 in the future.

    Agesilaus

  • Faring amidst high-swelling seas that rudely surge around,

    The Seven Plays in English Verse

  • Since great Ronsarde and learned Bellay have raised our French Poesie unto that height of honour where it now is: I see not one of these petty ballad-makers, or prentise dogrell rymers, that doth not bombast his labours with high-swelling and heaven-disimbowelling words, and that doth not marshall his cadences verie neere as they doe.

    Of the Institution and Education of Children. To the Ladie Diana of Foix, Countesse of Gurson.

  • Gay mansions, with supper-rooms and dancing-rooms, are full of light and music and high-swelling hearts; but, in the Condemned Cells, the pulse of life beats tremulous and faint, and blood-shot eyes look out through the darkness, which is around and within, for the light of a stern last morning.

    From Chaucer to Tennyson

  • Its little cupola connects it with the local style of architecture, to which the high-swelling name of Byzantino-Périgourdin has been given.

    Two Summers in Guyenne

  • Though little apt himself to use high-swelling words, it did not annoy him to hear others sounding their own praises, which he regarded as a harmless weakness, the pledge at least of high endeavour (3) in the future.

    Agesilaus

  • Italy and Greece are free, the lofty appeals to classic heroism are out of date, and such fiery high-swelling trumpet notes as

    Studies in Literature and History

  • Gay mansions, with supper-rooms and dancing-rooms, are full of light and music and high-swelling hearts; but, in the Condemned Cells, the pulse of life beats tremulous and faint, and bloodshot eyes look-out through the darkness, which is around and within, for the light of a stern last morning.

    Sartor Resartus, and On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and the Heroic in History

  • It puts me in mind of a dialogue in Lucian, [11] where Charon wafting one of their predecessors over Styx, ordered him to strip off his armour and fine clothes, yet still thought him too heavy; "But" (said he) "put off likewise that pride and presumption, those high-swelling words, and that vain-glory;" because they were of no use on the other side the water.

    The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D. — Volume 09 Contributions to The Tatler, The Examiner, The Spectator, and The Intelligencer

  • Bellay have raised our French Poesie unto that height of honour where it now is: I see not one of these petty ballad-makers, or prentise dogrell rymers, that doth not bombast his labours with high-swelling and heaven-disimbowelling words, and that doth not marshall his cadences verie neere as they doe.

    Literary and Philosophical Essays: French, German and Italian

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