Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Having similar quantities or variations pertaining to parts of structure.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

homoe- + o + -merous. From the Ancient Greek ὅμοιος (homoios, "of like kind”, “similar") in conjunction with μέρος (meros, "portion").

Examples

  • Heraclitus, with his reduction of everything to fire, is the token monist; Empedocles, with his four elements, represents finite pluralism; and Anaxagoras, read through the lens of Aristotelian doxography as making all the ˜homoeomerous™ or ˜like-parted™ stuffs the elements, is treated as fundamentally sui generis.

    Lucretius

  • Since then the composite cannot be an element, not every homoeomerous body can be an element; only, as we said before, that which is not divisible into bodies different in form.

    On the Heavens

  • Observation shows that even mixed bodies are often divisible into homoeomerous parts; examples are flesh, bone, wood, and stone.

    On the Heavens

  • We begin with the view of Anaxagoras that all the homoeomerous bodies are elements.

    On the Heavens

  • Earth and fire are mixtures, composed of them and all the other seeds, each consisting of a collection of all the homoeomerous bodies, separately invisible; and that explains why from these two bodies all others are generated.

    On the Heavens

  • His elements are the homoeomerous things, viz. flesh, bone, and the like.

    On the Heavens

  • Isomerous: with equal number of tarsal joints on all feet: = homoeomerous.

    Explanation of Terms Used in Entomology

  • For if all bodies are quantitatively commensurable, and the relative size of the various homoeomerous masses and of their several elements are in the same ratio, so that the total mass of water, for instance, is related to the total mass of air as the elements of each are to one another, and so on, and if there is more air than water and, generally, more of the finer body than of the coarser, obviously the element of water will be smaller than that of air.

    On the Heavens

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.