Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who or that which eats honey.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Endangered species include Regent honeyeaters, bush stone-curlew, squatter pigeon, superb parrot, swift parrot, turquoise parrot, gray-crown babbler, painted honey-eater and black-throated finch.

    ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES FOR ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATES

  • The fasciated honey-eater has loudly called “with a voice that seemed the very sound of happiness”; the leaden flycatcher, often silent but seldom still, has twittered and whispered plaintively; the sun-birds are playing gymnastics among the lemon blossoms, and the centre of activity for butterflies is the red-flowered shrub bordering the wavering path.

    Tropic Days

  • Tradition asserts that not many years since Timana was much favoured by nutmeg pigeons, now sparsely represented; but the varied honey-eater and a friar bird possessing a most mellow and fluty note, cockatoos and metallic starlings are plentiful.

    The Confessions of a Beachcomber

  • Birds ordinarily mute are vociferous, and the rowdy ones — the varied honey-eater as an example — losing all control of their tongues, call and whistle in ecstasy.

    The Confessions of a Beachcomber

  • Once aroused, the varied honey-eater is wide awake.

    The Confessions of a Beachcomber

  • Louhi sent Otso the Bear, the honey-eater, but he was slain by the hero, who made a banquet of his flesh for the people.

    National Epics

  • The fasciated honey-eater has loudly called "with a voice that seemed the very sound of happiness"; the leaden flycatcher, often silent but seldom still, has twittered and whispered plaintively; the sun-birds are playing gymnastics among the lemon blossoms, and the centre of activity for butterflies is the red-flowered shrub bordering the wavering path.

    Tropic Days

  • Birds ordinarily mute are vociferous, and the rowdy ones -- the varied honey-eater as an example -- losing all control of their tongues, call and whistle in ecstasy.

    Confessions of a Beachcomber

  • Low-lying Mung-um-gnackum, the abode of the varied honey-eater, the tranquil dove, and the brooding-place of the night-jar (CAPRIMULGUS) and lovely Kumboola, lie to the south-west, a bare half-mile away.

    Confessions of a Beachcomber

  • On the other hand, we can quite easily, without arming the eye with a lens, perceive the mouth-apparatus -- and particularly the mandibles -- of either a honey-eater, such as an Osmia, Chalicodoma or Megachile, or

    The Mason-Bees

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.