Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Common misspelling of horror.

Etymologies

Hypercorrect British or pseudo-British spelling of horror, influenced by words like colour. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Whether to _take horrour from the time_ means not rather to _catch_ _it_ as communicated, than to _deprive the time of horrour_, deserves te be considered.

    Notes to Shakespeare, Volume III: The Tragedies

  • Southwark ran with blood two or three days in the week; that he was afraid there were slaughter-houses in more streets in London than one supposes (speaking with a kind of horrour of butchering), and yet, he added, ‘any of us would kill a cow, rather than not have beef.’

    Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides

  • Pursuing the subject, he said, the kennels of Southwark ran with blood two or three days in the week; that he was afraid there were slaughter-houses in more streets in London than one supposes; (speaking with a kind of horrour of butchering;) and, yet he added, 'any of us would kill a cow rather than not have beef.'

    Life of Johnson

  • Pursuing the subject, he said, the kennels of Southwark ran with blood two or three days in the week; that he was afraid there were slaughter-houses in more streets in London than one supposes (speaking with a kind of horrour of butchering), and yet, he added, 'any of us would kill a cow, rather than not have beef.'

    The Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson, LL.D.

  • Educated in all the harmony of contentment and benevolence, she had a horrour of a temper so irascible, that made it a penance to remain a moment in its vicinity.

    Camilla

  • You have seen, here, the value of intellects in viewing the horrour of their loss; and you have witnessed, that beauty, without mind, is more dreadful than any deformity.

    Camilla

  • Silently, for some seconds, they sunk on the breast of each other; horrour closing all speech, drying up even their tears.

    Camilla

  • Camilla listened with horrour to this avowal, yet saw, with compassion, that her friend endeavoured to persuade herself she was free from wrong; though with censure that she sought to gloss over, rather than investigate, every doubt to the contrary: but while fear was predominant for the event of such a situation to herself, abhorrence filled her whole mind against Bellamy, in every part, every plan, and every probability of the business.

    Camilla

  • At length, however, with enthusiastic self-compulsion, slightly and fearfully, she lifted it up ... but instantly, and with instinctive horrour, snatched her hand away, and placed it before her shut eyes.

    Camilla

  • But wild with affright, or shuddering with horrour, she passed without hearing or observing him.

    Camilla

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