Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The common European swallow, Chelidon urbica. Also called eaves-swallow or easing-swallow, house-martin, etc.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Bent on loftier flights than such a poor house-swallow as a teacher in a

    Miscellaneous Papers

  • The swallows commonly found on the Nilgiris in summer are the Nilgiri house-swallow (_Hirundo javanica_) and the red-rumped or mosque swallow (_H. erythropygia_).

    Birds of the Indian Hills

  • The house-swallow has the rump glossy black, but it displays a good deal of red about the head and neck.

    Birds of the Indian Hills

  • The house-swallow, or chimney-swallow, is undoubtedly the first comer of all the British _hirundines_; and appears in general on or about the 13th of April, as I have remarked from many years 'observation.

    The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to Prose, Vol. IV (of X)—Great Britain and Ireland II

  • The ticking of the clock was so distinct that it made an echo in the high hall; the morning sun streamed across the pavement, from the cloistered garden the chirping of a few sparrows and the sharper twitter of the house-swallow that had already nested under the eaves sounded very clearly through the closed glass door.

    The White Sister

  • The material employed by him for this purpose is a kind of agglutinated mud, which he procures from the neighbouring watercourse or quagmire, and somewhat similar to that used by the common house-swallow for constructing _its_ peculiar nest.

    The Cliff Climbers A Sequel to "The Plant Hunters"

  • Perhaps, hereafter, I may be induced to take the house-swallow under consideration, and from that proceed to the rest of the British hirundines.

    The Natural History of Selborne, Vol. 2

  • Dear Sir, -- The house-swallow, or chimney-swallow, is undoubtedly the first comer of all the British hirundines; and appears in general on or about 13th April, as I have remarked from many years 'observation.

    The Natural History of Selborne, Vol. 2

  • The swift appears about ten or twelve days later than the house-swallow: viz., about the 24th or 26th April.

    The Natural History of Selborne, Vol. 1

  • I know to be wrong from repeated observation this summer; for house-martins do feed their young flying, though it must be acknowledged not so commonly as the house-swallow; and the feat is done in so quick a manner as not to be perceptible to indifferent observers.

    The Natural History of Selborne, Vol. 1

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