Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Any of the genus Houstonia of rubiaceous flowering plants.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From the genus name.

Examples

  • In the woods and on the hillsides the anemone could be seen; the houstonia added its color.

    Lee’s Lieutenants

  • They were gone a great while, and came back with a charming bunch -- arbutus, anemones, violets, and houstonia.

    Memories of Hawthorne

  • In the fall, if you can find the tufts of eye-bright or houstonia cerulia, and mingle them in with your mosses, you will find them blooming before winter is well over.

    American Woman's Home

  • It is a perfect flower with its petals, like the houstonia or anemone.

    A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers

  • The fall of snowflakes in a still air, preserving to each crystal its perfect form; the blowing of sleet over a wide sheet of water, and over plains, the waving rye-field, the mimic waving of acres of houstonia, whose innumerable florets whiten and ripple before the eye; the reflections of trees and flowers in glassy lakes; the musical steaming odorous south wind, which converts all trees to windharps; the crackling and spurting of hemlock in the flames; or of pine logs, which yield glory to the walls and faces in the sitting-room, —these are the music and pictures of the most ancient religion.

    XIV. Essays. Nature. 1844

  • The fall of snowflakes in a still air, preserving to each crystal its perfect form; the blowing of sleet over a wide sheet of water, and over plains, the waving rye-field, the mimic waving of acres of houstonia, whose innumerable florets whiten and ripple before the eye; the reflections of trees and flowers in glassy lakes; the musical steaming odorous south wind, which converts all trees to windharps; the crackling and spurting of hemlock in the flames; or of pine logs, which yield glory to the walls and faces in the sittingroom, -- these are the music and pictures of the most ancient religion.

    Essays: Second Series (1844)

  • The fall of snowflakes in a still air, preserving to each crystal its perfect form; the blowing of sleet over a wide sheet of water, and over plains; the waving rye-fields; the mimic waving of acres of houstonia, whose innumerable florets whiten and ripple before the eye; the reflections of trees and flowers in glassy lakes; the musical steaming odorous south wind, which converts all trees to wind-harps; [475] the crackling and spurting of hemlock in the flames; or of pine-logs, which yield glory to the walls and faces in the sitting-room, -- these are the music and pictures of the most ancient religion.

    Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson

  • Charlotte; "not this little houstonia, I hope; that has a perfection of organization in which many of your splendid green-house flowers are deficient.

    Rich Enough a tale of the times

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