Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of howlet.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • As for the whistle, it was gaen anes and ay; but mony a time was it heard at the top of the house on the bartizan, and amang the auld chimneys and turrets where the howlets have their nests.

    Redgauntlet

  • “If you bring these strange looks, and this stranger silence, into festivity, we shall wish you had abode in the marshes seeking for herons, or rather for woodcocks and howlets.”

    Quentin Durward

  • Gilian looked at them and saw them the birds of night and sea, the birds of prey, the howlets of the brine, flying large and powerful throughout the under-sky that is salt and swinging and never lit by moon or star.

    Gilian The Dreamer His Fancy, His Love and Adventure

  • How the trees, the tall companions, communed together in their heights among the stars! how the burns tinkled in the grasses and the howlets mourned.

    John Splendid The Tale of a Poor Gentleman, and the Little Wars of Lorn

  • "The ghaists and howlets that nightly cry about the ruins o 'Alloway's auld haunted kirk" rose on every imagination.

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 17, No. 475, February 5, 1831

  • As for the whistle, it was gaen anes and aye; but mony a time was it heard at the top of the house on the bartizan, and amang the auld chimneys and turrets, where the howlets have their nests.

    Wandering Willie’s Tale

  • "Holy Ouen!" scoffed Adhelmar; "these ladies, while well enough, I grant you, would seem to be callow howlets blinking about that Arabian Phoenix which Plinius tells of, in comparison with this Lady Venus that is dead!"

    The Line of Love Dizain des Mariages

  • As for the whistle, it was gane anes and aye; but mony a time was it heard at the top of the house on the bartizan, and amang the auld chimneys and turrets where the howlets have their nests.

    Wandering Willie’s Tale

  • As for the whistle, it was gane anes and aye; but mony a time was it heard at the top of the house on the bartizan, and amang the auld chimneys and turrets where the howlets have their nests.

    Stories by English Authors: Scotland (Selected by Scribners)

  • Imagine these two verses painted, and the painter, from a lack of comprehension, introducing the 'wild howlets screaming' _beside the burnie_, 'wandering and winding,' and the 'wee birdies' foolishly and inconsequently singing with their feeble song drowned in the rush of the burn (no longer a burnie), 'roaring and reaming,' when the 'spate' is spreading desolation on every side.

    The Old Masters and Their Pictures For the Use of Schools and Learners in Art

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