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human-heartedness

Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Humaneness; humanity.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Dharma duty, virtue insists that human-heartedness, benevolence, and compassion be a full part of wellness, for that is the way that suffering ends and the absolute is restored.

    Elizabeth Boleman-Herring: The One-Legged "Yogini"

  • Dharma duty, virtue insists that human-heartedness, benevolence, and compassion be a full part of wellness, for that is the way that suffering ends and the absolute is restored.

    Elizabeth Boleman-Herring: The One-Legged "Yogini"

  • Dharma duty, virtue insists that human-heartedness, benevolence, and compassion be a full part of wellness, for that is the way that suffering ends and the absolute is restored.

    Elizabeth Boleman-Herring: The One-Legged "Yogini"

  • And it was the Golden Rule would bring them to the transcendent value that he called ren, human-heartedness, which was a transcendent experience in itself.

    Karen Armstrong makes her TED Prize wish: the Charter for Compassion

  • And it was the Golden Rule would bring them to the transcendent value that he called ren, human-heartedness, which was a transcendent experience in itself.

    Karen Armstrong makes her TED Prize wish: the Charter for Compassion

  • And it was the Golden Rule would bring them to the transcendent value that he called ren, human-heartedness, which was a transcendent experience in itself.

    Karen Armstrong makes her TED Prize wish: the Charter for Compassion

  • The gallantry and the human-heartedness of Lafayette, as well as the ideals he held -- ideals that were becoming more and more captivating to the fancy and to the reason of the French nation -- contributed to make him the favorite of the hour.

    Lafayette

  • So much for the substantial manhood of Touchstone, and for the Poet's human-heartedness in thus putting us in communication with it.

    Shakespeare His Life Art And Characters

  • He has just enough of human-heartedness to know how he would feel were he human, and a proportionable sense of gratitude, which has been aptly called “the memory of the heart”: hence he needs to be often reminded of his obligations, but is religiously true to them so long as he remembers them.

    Shakespeare His Life Art And Characters

  • In acts like these, and in many another anecdote that might be given, is seen the genuine human-heartedness of the man, in strange contrast with the bitternesses which so often find vent in his letters.

    Robert Burns

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