Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of hunting-crop.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In the midst of the shouting and commotion Nan felt herself lifted up by Roger as easily as though she were a baby, and at the same moment the whirling lash of one of the men's hunting-crops cut her across the throat and bosom.

    The Moon out of Reach

  • Meanwhile the second whip had rushed out from his cottage to render assistance and the whistling of the long-lashed hunting-crops drove through the air, gradually forcing the yelping hounds into submission.

    The Moon out of Reach

  • He tugged at the pony's bridle; and Mrs. Ainslie, arriving presently, came to his assistance, while some of the other riders, coming up behind, encouraged Brunette with shouts and hunting-crops.

    Captain Jim

  • My father would give the word of command, "Line out!" and point out the direction in which we were to go, and we spread out over the stubble fields and meadows, whistling and winding about along the lee side of the steep balks,8 beating all the bushes with our hunting-crops, and gazing keenly at every spot or mark on the earth.

    Reminiscences of Tolstoy

  • My father would give the word of command, "Line out!" and point out the direction in which we were to go, and we spread out over the stubble fields and meadows, whistling and winding about along the lee side of the steep balks, [8] beating all the bushes with our hunting-crops, and gazing keenly at every spot or mark on the earth.

    Reminiscences of Tolstoy

  • When he came into my room, he observed my hunting-crops hanging on the wall from a rack, and said:

    Margot Asquith, an Autobiography - Two Volumes in One

  • Mrs. Pendyce did not sit down, but stood under an arrangement of three foxes 'heads, supporting two hunting-crops, with their lashes hanging down.

    Complete Project Gutenberg John Galsworthy Works

  • Many threw themselves down upon the turf and allowed successive waves to pass over their bodies, whilst others, driven wild by the blows, returned them with their hunting-crops and walking-canes.

    Rodney Stone

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