Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun See hurly-house.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Yet I now wish, since this Malcolm turns out such a parricide, for I can call him no better, as to think of alienating the family inheritance — I now wish (his eyes fixed on a part of the roof which was visible above the trees) that I could have left Rose the auld hurley-house and the riggs belanging to it.

    Waverley

  • I could have left Rose the auld hurley-house, and the riggs belonging to it.

    The Waverley

  • Yet I now wish, since this Malcolm turns out such a parricide, for I can call him no better, as to think of alienating the family inheritance-I now wish '(his eyes fixed on a part of the roof which was visible above the trees)' that I could have left Rose the auld hurley-house, and the riggs belanging to it.

    Waverley: or, 'Tis sixty years since

  • Yet I now wish, since this Malcolm turns out such a parricide, for I can call him no better, as to think of alienating the family inheritance -- I now wish (his eyes fixed on a part of the roof which was visible above the trees) that I could have left Rose the auld hurley-house and the riggs belanging to it.

    Waverley

  • Yet I now wish, since this Malcolm turns out such a parricide, for I can call him no better, as to think of alienating the family inheritance -- I now wish (his eyes fixed on a part of the roof which was visible above the trees) that I could have left Rose the auld hurley-house and the riggs belanging to it.

    Waverley — Volume 2

  • Yet I now wish, since this Malcolm turns out such a parricide, for I can call him no better, as to think of alienating the family inheritance -- I now wish (his eyes fixed on a part of the roof which was visible above the trees) that I could have left Rose the auld hurley-house and the riggs belanging to it.

    Waverley — Complete

  • “And well he deserves to be so,” said Sir Dugald Dalgetty, who came up to them at that moment with a prodigious addition of acquired importance, “since he shot my good horse at the time that I was offering him honourable quarter, which, I must needs say, was done more like an ignorant Highland cateran, who has not sense enough to erect a sconce for the protection of his old hurley-house of a castle, than like a soldier of worth and quality.”

    A Legend of Montrose

  • ` ` And well he deserves to be so, '' said Sir Dugald Dalgetty, who came up to them at that moment, with a prodigious addition of acquired importance, ` ` since he shot my good horse at the time that I was offering him honourable quarter, which, I must needs say, was done more like an ignorant Highland cateran, who has not sense enough to erect a sconce for the protection of his old hurley-house of a castle, than like a soldier of worth and quality. ''

    A Legend of Montrose

  • "And well he deserves to be so," said Sir Dugald Dalgetty, who came up to them at that moment with a prodigious addition of acquired importance, "since he shot my good horse at the time that I was offering him honourable quarter, which, I must needs say, was done more like an ignorant Highland cateran, who has not sense enough to erect a sconce for the protection of his old hurley-house of a castle, than like a soldier of worth and quality."

    A Legend of Montrose

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.