Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To move or act with undue hurry and confusion.
  • noun Confused haste; agitation.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Reduplication of hurry.]

Examples

  • But just who, in practice, in this hurry-scurry age, has time to heal a soul-sick nation?

    Robert Ellis Gordon: The Comet

  • But just who, in practice, in this hurry-scurry age, has time to heal a soul-sick nation?

    Robert Ellis Gordon: The Comet

  • But just who, in practice, in this hurry-scurry age, has time to heal a soul-sick nation?

    Robert Ellis Gordon: The Comet

  • The first Sunday class is almost full, so hurry-scurry!

    February 2009

  • The first Sunday class is almost full, so hurry-scurry!

    A few small things - A Dress A Day

  • Gardens provide a well-needed respite from the hurry-scurry of modern life.

    MAIL CALL AND CORRECTIONS

  • Not the hurry-scurry sprawl we have now, with the domed stadiums and the turnpikes going everywhere, and not the one I grew up in, either.

    Duma Key

  • But when they are really close to the hare they will make the matter plain to the huntsman by various signs — the quivering of their bodies backwards and forwards, sterns and all; the ardour meaning business; the rush and emulaton; the hurry-scurry to be first; the patient following-up of the whole pack; at one moment massed together, and at another separated; and once again the steady onward rush.

    On Hunting

  • And the result of this hurry-scurry was that he got to the beach too soon: his men had only just begun to open up the boat-shed.

    Ultima Thule

  • Pao-yü gulped down hurry-scurry the whole contents of the cup and started on his errand in the face of the snow.

    Hung Lou Meng

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