Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The period of time during which a wetland is covered by water.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Natural vegetation varies with site characteristics, mainly soil texture and hydroperiod.

    Ecoregions of Louisiana (EPA)

  • The highest productivity occur in a pulsing hydroperiod wetland that receives high inputs of nutrients, while lower productivity characterizes either drained or continuously flooded swamps.

    Wetland classifications

  • The most important environmental condition in this ecoregion is the hydroperiod, which controls the amount of oxygen and moisture available to the forest communities.

    Mississippi lowland forests

  • The floodplain forest communities can be segregated into different species assemblages, based on the hydroperiod.

    Mississippi lowland forests

  • Using the landscape variation of a glacial valley in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem as the context for a natural experiment, we examined variation in growth pattern and life history of the salamander Ambystoma tigrinum melanostictum and determined how these developmental characteristics varied with hydroperiod across 25 ponds over the course of three years

    BioMed Central - Latest articles

  • Using the landscape variation of a glacial valley in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem as the context for a natural experiment, we examined variation in growth pattern and life history of the salamander Ambystoma tigrinum melanostictum and determined how these developmental characteristics varied with hydroperiod across 25 ponds over the course of three years

    BioMed Central - Latest articles

  • Loss of pond habitat is catastrophic to aquatic larval amphibians, and even reduction in the amount of time a breeding site holds water (hydroperiod) can influence amphibian development and limit reproductive success.

    BioMed Central - Latest articles

  • Loss of pond habitat is catastrophic to aquatic larval amphibians, and even reduction in the amount of time a breeding site holds water (hydroperiod) can influence amphibian development and limit reproductive success.

    BioMed Central - Latest articles

  • Using the landscape variation of a glacial valley in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem as the context for a natural experiment, we examined variation in growth pattern and life history of the salamander Ambystoma tigrinum melanostictum and determined how these developmental characteristics varied with hydroperiod across 25 ponds over the course of three years

    BioMed Central - Latest articles

  • Loss of pond habitat is catastrophic to aquatic larval amphibians, and even reduction in the amount of time a breeding site holds water (hydroperiod) can influence amphibian development and limit reproductive success.

    BioMed Central - Latest articles

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