Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Same as hygroscopic.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It is very hygroscopical, and under ordinary circumstances it contains from 13 to 16 per cent. humidity, in dry air from 7 to 11 per cent., which can be entirely expelled at a temperature of from 226 to 230 degrees Fahrenheit.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 821, September 26, 1891

  • The hygroscopical and the thermoscopical conditions of the atmosphere are, therefore, inseparably connected as reciprocally dependent quantities, and neither can be fully discussed without taking notice of the other.

    Earth as Modified by Human Action, The~ Chapter 03 (historical)

  • The hygroscopical and the thermoscopical conditions of the atmosphere are, therefore, inseparably connected as reciprocally dependent quantities, and neither can be fully discussed without taking notice of the other.

    The Earth as Modified by Human Action

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