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hyperconsumption

Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Excessive consumption of goods (as a sociological phenomenon).

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

hyper- +‎ consumption

Examples

  • But their "hyperconsumption" effectively torpedoes any chances they would have at accumulating real wealth, which typically requires spending significantly less than you earn and investing the difference.

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  • Faced with the same decision, Europe veered towards the first option, prioritizing social and individual health and well-being over hyperconsumption.

    THE STORY OF STUFF

  • You and I happen to live during a period when this confusion feeds and is fed by an extraordinary hyperconsumption of material things from all over the world.

    Beginner’s Grace

  • You and I happen to live during a period when this confusion feeds and is fed by an extraordinary hyperconsumption of material things from all over the world.

    Beginner’s Grace

  • Faced with the same decision, Europe veered towards the first option, prioritizing social and individual health and well-being over hyperconsumption.

    THE STORY OF STUFF

  • While the highest rates of consumption have historically happened in wealthy regions like the United States and Europe, most developing countries now have a rising “consumer class” that is increasingly adopting the same patterns of hyperconsumption.

    THE STORY OF STUFF

  • While the highest rates of consumption have historically happened in wealthy regions like the United States and Europe, most developing countries now have a rising “consumer class” that is increasingly adopting the same patterns of hyperconsumption.

    THE STORY OF STUFF

  • You and I happen to live during a period when this confusion feeds and is fed by an extraordinary hyperconsumption of material things from all over the world.

    Beginner’s Grace

  • Faced with the same decision, Europe veered towards the first option, prioritizing social and individual health and well-being over hyperconsumption.

    THE STORY OF STUFF

  • While the highest rates of consumption have historically happened in wealthy regions like the United States and Europe, most developing countries now have a rising “consumer class” that is increasingly adopting the same patterns of hyperconsumption.

    THE STORY OF STUFF

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