Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A nanostructured metamaterial that produces magnified images of objects smaller than the wavelength of the light used.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • NIMs have a number of desirable properties that do not exist in normal materials, including the ability to focus light to a point smaller than its wavelength in a so-called "hyperlens".

    physicsworld.com: all content

  • Possible applications include a "planar hyperlens" that could make optical microscopes

    Nano Tech Wire

  • Alexander Kildishev will report on optical metamaterial progress at Purdue, including the shortest wavelength light (710 nm) yet achieved for a negative index metamaterial, and the improved design of a cylindrical-shaped hyperlens.

    Scientific Blogging

  • A hyperlens is part of a larger group of materials known as metamaterials, which unlike normal materials, derive their physical properties from their physical structure instead of their chemical components.

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  • While Zhang made his hyperlens from brass for easier production, it can also be produced from many other more durable materials, including steel.

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  • The durability will be important for deploying a hyperlens underwater that could give submarines a detailed view of underwater geographical features or incoming enemy submarines.

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  • The brass hyperlens is made of 36 fins, spread out in a half circle like a handheld fan.

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  • This new metamaterial is the first acoustic hyperlens Podolskiy has heard of.

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  • They are also working to make their acoustic hyperlens compatible with pulse-echo technology, which is the basis of both medical ultrasounds and underwater sonar imaging systems.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

  • "Our acoustic hyperlens relies on straightforward cutoff-free propagation and achieves deep subwavelength resolution with low loss over a broad frequency bandwidth."

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

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