Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A solid of four or more dimensions.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • We may call the hypersolid a double prism, a prism-cylinder, or a double cylinder according as we have two polygons, a polygon and a curve, or two curves.

    The Fourth Dimension Simply Explained

  • A hypersolid, that is, a portion of four-dimensional space, may be separated into two parts by a three-space.

    The Fourth Dimension Simply Explained

  • A plane cannot separate two parts of a hypersolid any more than a line can separate two parts of a solid in our space.

    The Fourth Dimension Simply Explained

  • The plate passing through the hypersolid could extend indefinitely in its two principal dimensions but the hypersolid would not fall apart.

    The Fourth Dimension Simply Explained

  • Sometimes the term hypersphere is used to denote the hypersolid, the portion of four-space inclosed by this locus, which is then called the boundary or hypersurface of the hypersphere.

    The Fourth Dimension Simply Explained

  • When one of the component cylinders has a very small radius in comparison with the other, so that the second has a very sall altitude, one cylinder being like a rope and the other like a wheel,13 the hypersolid is what we have called a doubly circular wheel (page 31).

    The Fourth Dimension Simply Explained

  • Thus a section, cutting a hypersolid into two parts, will be three-dimensional.

    The Fourth Dimension Simply Explained

  • These two ring-shaped figures fit completely, and together form the boundary of a hypersolid, inclosing a portion of four-space.

    The Fourth Dimension Simply Explained

  • At any point in the three-dimensional boundary of the hypersolid we can start and go in three mutually perpendicular directions within this boundary -- in as many directions as we have altogether in our three-dimensional space.

    The Fourth Dimension Simply Explained

  • We may have to trace curved paths if the boundary of the hypersolid is curved, but the paths start out in three mutually perpendicular directions just as in our space.

    The Fourth Dimension Simply Explained

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