Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A pitcher for holding iced water, often made of metal, with double or non-conducting walls.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • “The piece about the Mississippi is capital,” he notified Clemens, “—it almost made the water in our ice-pitcher muddy as it read it…I want the sketches, if you can make them, every month.”

    Mark Twain

  • “The piece about the Mississippi is capital,” he notified Clemens, “—it almost made the water in our ice-pitcher muddy as it read it…I want the sketches, if you can make them, every month.”

    Mark Twain

  • It almost made the water in our ice-pitcher muddy as I read it.

    Mark Twain: A Biography

  • Presently our patient begins to suffer an intolerable thirst, and runs to the ice-pitcher to quench it.

    The Opium Habit

  • She left him walking up and down the veranda, while she ran for the ice-pitcher and a goblet, and when she came back he was still walking up and down, shouting the story he had told her to her father and mother, who had come out more sketchily dressed than they commonly were by day.

    Different Girls

  • A gentleman, given somewhat to investigation, made the statement to us, while in St. Paul, that he had carefully watched the ice-pitcher on his table during the summers, and that it was rare that any moisture accumulated upon the outside of the same, as is commonly the case elsewhere.

    Minnesota; Its Character and Climate Likewise Sketches of Other Resorts Favorable to Invalids; Together With Copious Notes on Health; Also Hints to Tourists and Emigrants.

  • She set down the ice-pitcher on the veranda floor, and ran up-stairs and got the letter she had written him.

    Different Girls

  • Apples taken from trees in a cool day remain at the temperature of the air until a change to a higher temperature occurs, and then condensation of moisture from the warmer air circulating around the fruit occurs, just as moisture gathers upon the outside of an ice-pitcher in summer.

    Prairie Farmer, Vol. 56: No. 3, January 19, 1884. A Weekly Journal for the Farm, Orchard and Fireside

  • Disreppitableness oozed out through him like sweat through an ice-pitcher, an 'since then he's been known as Slapjack Simms, an' has kept his head shingled smooth as a gun bar'l.

    The Spoilers

  • Resolutions began to come from Women’s Christian Temperance Union branches East and West until Secretary Loeb published the facts, which were these: that no sideboard had ever been presented to Mrs. Hayes, but an ice-pitcher with stand, long since placed in a Cincinnati museum, where it now is.

    XII. The Despair Of Politicians

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