Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A fanciful or poetical name for a glacier.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Years ago, when first detached from the ice-river of some tortuous fiord, it had perhaps measured its depth in hundreds of yards; and even now, judging from its height above the surface of the sea, -- about eight feet on the average, -- it must have drawn nearly eight fathoms of water.

    Adrift in the Ice-Fields

  • "See! we are standing upon it now; at least, this glacier is an ice-river of Alaska, and Alaska has not been wiped off the map!"

    On a Torn-Away World Or, the Captives of the Great Earthquake

  • Among many exciting episodes may be mentioned shooting "rattlers" in the Sierras, encounters with narwhals and bears in the Arctic regions, a hairbreadth escape on the terrible ice-river of Spitzbergen, and adventures among the savages of Patagonia. '

    Adventures in Many Lands

  • It is, perhaps, quite needless to state that but onehalf remains, hence its name, the other half having been carried away by the great ice-river in the stormy time of the Glacial Period.

    Dutch Courage

  • The end of the glacier, or ice-river, had broken off and fallen down into the water!

    The Eskimo Twins

  • It is, perhaps, quite needless to state that but one-half remains, hence its name, the other half having been carried away by the great ice-river in the stormy time of the Glacial Period.

    Dutch Courage

  • For it is sometimes 600 feet thick, and we are not accustomed to rivers 600 feet deep; no, our rivers are 6 feet, 20 feet, and sometimes 50 feet deep; we are not quite able to grasp so large a fact as an ice-river 600 feet deep.

    A Tramp Abroad

  • Under the projecting edge of this vast ice-river I could see down beneath it to a depth of fifty feet or so in some places, where logs and branches were being crushed to pulp, some of it almost fine enough for paper, though most of it stringy and coarse.

    Travels in Alaska

  • But wonderful as this noble ice-river is in size and depth and in power displayed, far more wonderful was the vastly greater glacier three or four thousand feet, or perhaps a mile, in depth, whose size and general history is inscribed on the sides of the walls and over the tops of the rocks in characters which have not yet been greatly dimmed by the weather.

    Travels in Alaska

  • But by sunrise all these cliff, jungle, and torrent troubles were overcome and I gladly found myself free on the magnificent ice-river.

    Travels in Alaska

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