Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Bearing the marks of the former presence of ice; smoothed, polished, grooved, or scratched by the movement of masses of ice containing embedded detritus.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • With heavy packs upon their backs men plunged waist-deep into hideous quagmires, bridged mountain torrents by felling trees across them, toiled against the precipitous slopes of the ice-worn mountains, and crossed the dizzy faces of innumerable glaciers.

    The Shrinkage of the Planet

  • Occasionally we may have also to distinguish between all these deposits and the _débris_ brought down by land-slides, or by sudden freshets transporting to a distance a vast amount of loose materials which are neither ice-worn nor water-worn.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 13, No. 80, June, 1864

  • Ocean, I have had my attention directed to its prevailing winds and currents, and the way in which they affect its temperature, and also to the ice-worn appearance of its isolated lands.

    Scientific American Supplement No. 819, September 12, 1891

  • With heavy packs upon their backs men plunged waist-deep into hideous quagmires, bridged mountain torrents by felling trees across them, toiled against the precipitous slopes of the ice-worn mountains, and crossed the dizzy faces of innumerable glaciers.

    The Shrinkage of the Planet

  • On Oppapago, which is also called Sheep Mountain, one finds not far from the beds of cassiope the ice-worn, stony hollows where the big-horns cradle their young.

    The Land of Little Rain

  • On Oppapago, which is also called Sheep Mountain, one finds not far from the beds of cassiope the ice-worn, stony hollows where the big-horns cradle their young.

    The Land of Little Rain

  • With heavy packs upon their backs men plunged waist-deep into hideous quagmires, bridged mountain torrents by felling trees across them, toiled against the precipitous slopes of the ice-worn mountains, and crossed the dizzy faces of innumerable glaciers.

    Revolution, and Other Essays

  • Kelas is some two thousand feet higher than the other peaks of the Gangir chain, with strongly defined ledges and terraces marking its stratifications, and covered with horizontal layers of snow standing out in brilliant colour against the dark ice-worn rock.

    In the Forbidden Land

  • It showed strongly defined ledges and terraces marking its stratification, and these were covered with horizontal layers of snow of brilliant white in contrast to the dark, ice-worn rock.

    An Explorer's Adventures in Tibet

  • By cool efforts, along glassy, ice-worn slopes, I reached the upper end in a little over

    Steep Trails

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