Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun One who believes in or professes immaterialism.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Philos.) One who believes in or professes, immaterialism.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A supporter of the philosophy of immaterialism.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Samuel Johnson once showed his contempt for the “immaterialist” views of Bishop Berkeley — in essence, arguing that perception is the only reality — by kicking a rock and saying, “I refute him thusly.”

    The Real Thing: Cullen Murphy

  • The former would make Malebranche an idealist or an immaterialist, the latter a Spinozist, but he rejects all such epithets.

    Malebranche's Theory of Ideas and Vision in God

  • After all, what would we gain in saying materialist views of mind are science but not as rational to believe in than immaterialist views?

    The Discovery Institute and publications - The Panda's Thumb

  • After all, what would we gain in saying materialist views of mind are science but not as rational to believe in than immaterialist views?

    A critique of Himmelfarb's scientific views - The Panda's Thumb

  • On the contrary, as was indicated above, he holds that only an immaterialist account of such objects can avoid skepticism about their existence and nature.

    George Berkeley

  • (as Berkeley needed to convince his readers in both books) that a commonsensical philosophy could be built on an immaterialist foundation, that no one but a skeptic or atheist would ever miss matter.

    George Berkeley

  • (sometimes styled the Philosophical Commentaries), which he began in 1707, provide rich documentation of Berkeley's early philosophical evolution, enabling the reader to track the emergence of his immaterialist philosophy from a critical response to Descartes,

    George Berkeley

  • The immaterialist proceeds to say, that what we call matter has been strewn to be so exceedingly porous, that, for any thing we know, all the solid particles in the universe might be contained in a nutshell, that there is no such thing in the external world as actual contact, and that no two particles of matter were ever so near to each other, but that they might be brought nearer, if a sufficient force could be applied for that purpose.

    Thoughts on Man: His Nature, Productions, and Discoveries

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