Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • In an immovable manner; so as not to be moved or altered; unalterably; unchangeably.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adverb In an immovable manner.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adverb In an immovable manner.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adverb so as to be incapable of moving

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • "Yes," said he, giving her his hand; "if I could not, then ----" he did not finish his sentence, but fixed his eyes with a stern expression immovably on her.

    The Home

  • "You haven't scalded the dishcloth in clean hot water as I told you to do," said Marilla immovably.

    The Dishcloth

  • It's unhealthy to build them, and it's unhealthy if they are immovably there from the beginning.

    Archive 2009-04-01

  • Before the NINNY becomes immovably entrenched, the real history of the Iraqi campaign needs to be told.

    Iraq

  • "You haven't scalded the dishcloth in clean hot water as I told you to do," said Marilla immovably.

    Archive 2009-08-01

  • Silently, immovably, they saw each other face to face—eye to eye.

    DARKWATER

  • So what happens when the irresistible desire to be different meets immovably similar tastes?

    Your baby is unique, but her name isn't

  • Every day, even whilst this government is in it's death throes, the Left immovably institutionalises itself with such devastating success that one really can't believe there is nobody behind such coordination.

    Tony Blair: The Next Labour Prime Minister?

  • In time, the company began putting live rattlesnakes in its strongboxes and molding silver coins into immovably heavy seven-hundred-pound cannonballs to deter Harris and such fellow highwaymen as Rattlesnake Dick and Black Bart from lifting them.

    LIGHTING OUT FOR THE TERRITORY

  • Rockwell remains resolutely, immovably on the mild side even when he goes "serious," as in his famous "Four Freedoms" series from 1942.

    Norman Rockwell exhibit opens at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

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