inartificially love

Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • In an inartificial or artless manner; in a manner regardless of the rules of art; without art.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The incidents were inartificially huddled together.

    The Monastery

  • 'Camilla,' he presently continued, 'seems the most inartificially sweet, the most unobtrusively gay, and the most attractively lovely of almost any young creature I ever beheld.'

    Camilla

  • “On the contrary, monsieur — the children are the most sincere; they have not yet had time to become accomplished in duplicity; they will tell lies, but they do it inartificially, and you know they are lying; but the grown-up people are very false; they deceive strangers, they deceive each other —”

    The Professor, by Charlotte Bronte

  • At a reasonable time after dinner I propose to lead the conversation back again — as inartificially as I can — to the subject of the Diamond, and of the Indian conspiracy to steal it.

    The Moonstone

  • For where the Stage should alway represent but one place, and the uttermoste time presupposed in it, should bee both by Aristotles {156} precept, and common reason, but one day; there is both manie dayes and places, inartificially imagined.

    Defence of Poesie

  • For where the stage should always represent but one place, and the uttermost time presupposed in it should be, both by Aristotle's precept and common reason, but one day: there is both many days, and many places, inartificially imagined.

    English literary criticism

  • Nature is really at a low ebb, and that, with thousands even of the educated, nothing gives so little solid satisfaction as lovely scenery or other inartificially beautiful phenomena.

    The Continental Monthly , Vol. 2 No. 5, November 1862 Devoted to Literature and National Policy

  • For where the stage should always represent but one place, and the uttermost time presupposed in it should be, both by Aristotle’s precept and common reason, but one day; there is both many days and many places inartificially imagined.

    The Defense of Poesy

  • It must have been written early in 1829, if not before, and it is noticed in the review of "The Token" in Willis's Boston periodical, "The American Monthly Magazine" for September, 1829, where it is described as a "pleasing story, told quite inartificially," and is illustrated by a brief extract.

    Nathaniel Hawthorne

  • I may add that the windows opening outwards are purposely so inartificially made that no one passing along the road underneath would suspect that there was a fortress above his head.

    Castles and Cave Dwellings of Europe

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