inevitableness love

Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The state or character of being inevitable; inevitability.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The state of being unavoidable; certainty to happen; inevitability.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The characteristic of being inevitable; inevitability.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the quality of being unavoidable

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • When it came to housework, Mother possessed the quality called inevitableness to an extraordinary degree.

    My Boyhood

  • The first and most obvious fact about the Duke was his independence, and what I may call his inevitableness of action.

    The Adventure of Living

  • The first and most obvious fact about the Duke was his independence, and what I may call his inevitableness of action.

    The Adventure of Living : a Subjective Autobiography

  • When it came to housework, Mother possessed the quality called inevitableness to an extraordinary degree.

    My Boyhood

  • The truth {164} concerning the "inevitableness" of sin was stated by our Lord when He said, "It must needs be that occasions" -- _viz. _, of stumbling -- "come; but woe to that man through whom the occasion cometh."

    Problems of Immanence: studies critical and constructive

  • Maurice de Guérin's feverish ethereal charm; his account of the opposition _salons_ under the Empire -- they had all been elaborated in the course of years, till every word fitted and each point led to the next with the 'inevitableness' of true art.

    Robert Elsmere

  • It lacks the note of inevitableness which is the final touchstone of tragic greatness.

    Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern — Volume 4

  • My temper and my courtesy scarcely serve me, my Lord, to reply to your assertion of the "inevitableness" that, while half of Great Britain is laid out in hunting-grounds for sport more savage than the Indians, the poor of our cities must be swept into incestuous heaps; or into dens and caves which are only tombs disquieted, so changing the whiteness of

    On the Old Road, Vol. 2 (of 2) A Collection of Miscellaneous Essays and Articles on Art and Literature

  • A visit of his youth to the Island grave of Chateaubriand; his early memories, as a poetical aspirant, of the magnificent flatteries by which Victor Hugo made himself the god of young romantic Paris; his talks with Montalembert in the days of _L'Avenir_; his memories of Lamennais 'sombre figure, of Maurice de Guérin's feverish ethereal charm; his account of the opposition _salons_ under the Empire -- they had all been elaborated in the course of years, till every word fitted and each point led to the next with the' inevitableness 'of true art.

    Robert Elsmere

  • "inevitableness" which sometimes amounts to improbability, as in the case particularly of that most vivid and racy of books, _Cripps the

    The English Novel

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