infant formula love

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Examples

  • By the late 1920s a number of large U.S. pharmaceutical companies, such as Ross Laboratories, Mead Johnson, and Wyeth Laboratories, manufactured and marketed infant formula in the United States.

    Strategic Management in Developing Countries Case Studies

  • It also indicated that Nestlé medical representatives would not wear official uniforms, that their salary would not be sales-related, and that they would not be allowed to sell infant formula to mothers.

    Strategic Management in Developing Countries Case Studies

  • A more sensational allegation leveled at the infant-formula manufacturers was that promoting infant formula had caused a decline in breast-feeding and consequently an increase in infant malnutrition and death.

    Strategic Management in Developing Countries Case Studies

  • In 1975 the infant formula industry formed an association, the International Council of Infant Food Industries ICIFI, to foster free exchange of information and cooperation with respect to infant nutrition.

    Strategic Management in Developing Countries Case Studies

  • Since July 4, 1977, an organization called INFACT (Infant Formula Action Coalition) had been coordinating and promoting a consumer boycott of all products marketed by the U.S. company, because INFACT asserted Nestlé employed inappropriate marketing techniques in selling its infant formula products in less developed countries (LDCs).

    Strategic Management in Developing Countries Case Studies

  • INFACT did not advocate total withdrawal of infant formula from LDCs, but rather the cessation of such practices as the use of “milk nurses,” the distribution of free samples, promotion of formula through the medical profession, and the direct promotion of formula to consumers.

    Strategic Management in Developing Countries Case Studies

  • In his concluding remarks, Senator Kennedy stated that postmarketing surveillance by infant formula manufacturers of where their products end up and how they are actually used did not appear to be a primary consideration of the manufacturers.17 He felt they tended to rely on the medical profession, the nurses, and the distribution networks in LDCs.

    Strategic Management in Developing Countries Case Studies

  • Less than a year later, the journalist Mike Muller wrote an article called “The Baby Killer,” which decried the promotions of infant formula manufacturers in LDCs as stimulating the trend away from breast-feeding.

    Strategic Management in Developing Countries Case Studies

  • Dr. James Post of Boston University, in testimony before the U.S. Congress in 1978, estimated world sales of infant formula at about $1.5 billion in 1977, with LDCs representing about $600 million.

    Strategic Management in Developing Countries Case Studies

  • Compared to breast-feeding, artificial feeding, whether with infant formula or more “traditional” foods like paps and gruels, exposed the child to greater risk of bacterial infection.

    Strategic Management in Developing Countries Case Studies

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