Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Law Contrary to natural affection or moral duty. Used of a will in which the testator disinherits the rightful heirs with insufficient reason.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Indifferent to obligation or duty.
  • adj. Not officious; not civil or attentive.
  • adj. Contrary to one's natural obligation or duty, as of a testament by which a child is unjustly deprived of inheritance.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Indifferent to obligation or duty.
  • adj. Not officious; not civil or attentive.
  • adj. Regardless of natural obligation; contrary to natural duty; unkind; -- commonly said of a testament made without regard to natural obligation, or by which a child is unjustly deprived of inheritance.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Regardless of the obligations incident to one's office or position; contrary or inattentive to duty.

Etymologies

Latin inofficiōsus, undutiful : in-, not; see in-1 + officiōsus, dutiful; see officious.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Latin inofficiosus: compare French inofficieux. See in- not, and officious. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Unless a legitimate portion, a fourth part, had been reserved for the children, they were entitled to institute an action or complaint of _inofficious_ testament; to suppose that their father's understanding was impaired by sickness or age, and respectfully to appeal from his rigorous sentence to the deliberate wisdom of the magistrate.

    The Great Events by Famous Historians, Volume 04

  • [153] Unless a legitimate portion, a fourth part, had been reserved for the children, they were entitled to institute an action or complaint of inofficious testament; to suppose that their father's understanding was impaired by sickness or age; and respectfully to appeal from his rigorous sentence to the deliberate wisdom of the magistrate.

    History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire — Volume 4

  • a legitimate portion, a fourth part, had been reserved for the children, they were entitled to institute an action or complaint of _inofficious_ testament; to suppose that their father's understanding was impaired by sickness or age; and respectfully to appeal from his rigorous sentence to the deliberate wisdom of the magistrate.

    History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire — Volume 4

  • The men and women are inofficious and are not passionate either. "

    Foreign Policy In Focus

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.