Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A male intriguer.
  • Intriguing; plotting; manœuvering.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • That such abuses do really exist I have proved beyond the power of contradiction; and that they are at least tolerated by those -- whoever they may be -- who possess without exercising the means of preventing, does not require the ingenuity of an "intrigant" to discover, as the fact is self-evident.

    The Life of Thomas, Lord Cochrane, Tenth Earl of Dundonald, G.C.B., Admiral of the Red, Rear-Admiral of the Fleet, Etc., Etc. Vol. I

  • I cannot, therefore, admit that either my complaints or suspicions are "tout a fait imaginaires," or that they are "des petitesses," as your excellency is pleased contemptuously to term them; but whatever they are, they originate in my own observation, without any assistance from the spectacles of an "intrigant," with which I am so gratuitously accommodated by your excellency.

    The Life of Thomas, Lord Cochrane, Tenth Earl of Dundonald, G.C.B., Admiral of the Red, Rear-Admiral of the Fleet, Etc., Etc. Vol. I

  • I know him as courtier, too, and as a bold _intrigant_.

    The Short-story

  • Fools had oft intruded themselves in great events ere this, but not those who wore the motley; heretofore had the latter been content with the posts of entertainers, leaving to others the more precarious offices of intrigant.

    Under the Rose

  • I knew him as a courtier, too, and as a bold intrigant.

    The Purloined Letter

  • Here, for intrigant and ravager, penitent and saint, failure and world-weary, was sanctuary -- respite, if only for an hour, from sin and strife, passion and hate and self.

    The House of Toys

  • He is an intrigant in politics, and has no domestic life in him; while Tina, however much she loves and appreciates admiration, has a perfect woman's heart.

    Oldtown Folks

  • I cannot, therefore, admit that either my complaints or suspicions are “tout a fait imaginaires,” or that they are “des petitesses,” as your excellency is pleased contemptuously to term them; but whatever they are, they originate in my own observation, without any assistance from the spectacles of an “intrigant,” with which I am so gratuitously accommodated by your excellency.

    The Life of Thomas Lord Cochrane

  • [FN#268] Here again we have a suggestion that Ja'afar presumed upon his favour with the Caliph; such presumption would soon be reported (perhaps by the austère intrigant himself) to the royal ears, and lay the foundation of ill-will likely to end in utter destruction.

    Arabian nights. English

  • That Charles was the _intrigant_ must be clear and palpable from what had happened, and accordingly, after taking a serious review of his own iniquity, he felt, as we said, peculiarly gratified with his prospects.

    The Evil Eye; Or, The Black Spector The Works of William Carleton, Volume One

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