Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Simple past tense and past participle of irreconcile.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Unreconciled; not brought under reconciliation, or into harmony or consistency.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Or that Syria will talk about stabilizing Iraq, while they continue to destabilize it, and say, oh, we aren't actually interested in talking about the fact that we are irreconciled.

    CNN Transcript Jan 11, 2007

  • See the statement of San Agustin quoted on p. 22, which gives the irreconciled

    Doctrina Christiana The first book printed in the Philippines, Manila, 1593.

  • So, if a son that is by his father sent about merchandise do sinfully miscarry upon the sea, the imputation of his wickedness, by your rule, should be imposed upon his father that sent him: or if a servant, under his master¬ís command transporting a sum of money, be assailed by robbers and die in many irreconciled iniquities, you may call the business of the master the author of the servant¬ís damnation.

    Act IV. Scene I. The Life of King Henry the Fifth

  • Only young Langdon was irreconciled, and eventually set out for a voyage around the world to escape the situation.

    Mark Twain, a Biography. Complete

  • Although the main parties might remain irreconciled, the Palestinian people most certainly are not.

    The Guardian World News

  • Fearful of being dominated or of being overpowered by a larger India seen as irreconciled to the partition, Pakistan's leaders relied on Islam and an image of non-India to try and establish an identity.

    IntelliBriefs

  • & all who were concerned in the offence except those who made necessary concessions. 6 The most of the Students are greatly irreconciled to

    Letter from Iveson L. Brookes to Jonathan Brookes, September 1816

  • So, if a son that is by his father sent about merchandise do sinfully miscarry upon the sea, the imputation of his wickedness by your rule, should be imposed upon his father that sent him: or if a servant, under his master's command transporting a sum of money, be assailed by robbers and die in many irreconciled iniquities, you may call the business of the master the author of the servant's damnation: but this is not so: the king is not bound to answer the particular endings of his soldiers, the father of his son, nor the master of his servant; for they purpose not their death, when they purpose their services.

    The Life of King Henry V

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