Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A Brazilian shrub (Myrciaria cauliflora) cultivated for its purplish-black fruits, which are borne directly on its trunk and larger branches.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The evergreen Brazilian grape tree, Myrciaria cauliflora, a fruit-bearing tree native to Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay.
  • n. Its fruit, purplish-black with a white pulp, which can be eaten raw or used in jellies and drinks.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A small evergreen tropical tree (Myrciaria cauliflora) native to Brazil and West Indies but introduced into southern U. S.; it is grown in Brazil for its edible tough-skinned purple grapelike fruit that grows all along the branches.
  • n. The tough-skinned purple grapelike tropical fruit of the jaboticaba tree (Myrciaria cauliflora), grown in Brazil.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. small evergreen tropical tree native to Brazil and West Indies but introduced into southern United States; grown in Brazil for its edible tough-skinned purple grapelike fruit that grows all along the branches
  • n. tough-skinned purple grapelike tropical fruit grown in Brazil

Etymologies

Portuguese, from Tupi iauoti kaua, having branches tipped with black fruit.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Portuguese jaboticaba (also spelt jabuticaba), from Tupian yawoti’kawa ("jaboticaba fruit") or ïapoti’kaba ("fruit in bloom"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Our fruits are of exceptional quality, and we have so many kinds, including the exotic and largely untranslatable caju and jaboticaba, as well as mangos, grapes, peaches and the sweetest pineapple ever.

    Rio de Janeiro

  • She also grows jaboticaba, whose grape-like fruits make a lovely liqueur.

    One Big Table

  • “Have you ever seen a Russian guy taste a jaboticaba for the first time?” he asks, referring to a fruit that “looks like an alien embryo and tastes totally out of this world.”

    The Fruit Hunters

  • The Brazilian fruit photographer Silvestre Silva spent ten years searching for the white jaboticaba.

    The Fruit Hunters

  • Brazilian writer Monteiro Lobato describes the sound of a jaboticaba kiss as “plock, pluff, pituy.”

    The Fruit Hunters

  • Rescued from the brink of extinction, the white jaboticaba has been propagated, and will be bearing fruits sometime in the near future.

    The Fruit Hunters

  • Because the fruit grows directly on the tree trunk like some sort of sweet fungus, the best way to eat one is a “jaboticaba kiss.”

    The Fruit Hunters

  • I've used this on miracle fruit, coffee, pitomba, jaboticaba and lychee.

    6: Soil health and plant nutrition

  • Choose from a wide selection of traditional dishes and succulent meats including fresh shrimp and fish bobo, pork ribs with jaboticaba sauce and tasty endive, chicken, mango, coconut milk and yogurt salad.

    ETravelBlackboard.com

  • [ECHO's jaboticaba tree is producing a bumper crop.

    14: From farm to market

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