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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Inside this "jellab" the basha is squeezed, standing up, and he remains there on a sparse diet of bread and water till he divulges.

    In the Tail of the Peacock

  • Israelite made us suits of rough brown jellab material, for the sum of £1 each -- stuff which wore for ever.

    In the Tail of the Peacock

  • He and another Moor had superintended the distribution of them; and to their lasting disgrace, deaf to argument and remonstrance on the part of the missionaries, they each appropriated a jellab to himself, saying, "This is my share; this goes to me."

    In the Tail of the Peacock

  • Part of the sleeves, the hood, and front of the jellab are often beautifully embroidered in coloured silks.

    In the Tail of the Peacock

  • Cadour took off his brown jellab, and spread it for us to sit upon.

    In the Tail of the Peacock

  • His jellab hung in tatters, but he also carried a gun, and by a string a brace of partridges and a wild duck, which "bag," after some bargaining, became ours for the sum of one-and-sixpence.

    In the Tail of the Peacock

  • It was a rude shock to our faith when his hand found its way into the leather bag at his side under his jellab, and he pulled out and threw on the table two-thirds of the money which had been given him.

    In the Tail of the Peacock

  • He bought a new jellab for wearing on visits to the sok; and after it had been proudly shown us, it was found, neatly folded up, placed on a hat-box in our bedroom.

    In the Tail of the Peacock

  • Here the first sign of humanity showed itself: two goatherds drove their flock down to the water, and one of them carried in the hood of his brown jellab a few hours 'old kid; they soon passed on and disappeared among the boulders and heath.

    In the Tail of the Peacock

  • Nor have the Riffis, in common with the Moors, reached the point of discarding "petticoats and drapery" -- that is to say, they wear the brown, hooded, woollen jellab, and the white woollen haik -- a sheet of material without seam, which they cast round themselves something like a Roman toga.

    In the Tail of the Peacock

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