Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Symbol for the kilopascal, an SI unit of pressure and stress equal to 103 pascals.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • My design addresses the issues of allowing maximum mobility/flexibility and providing (relatively) high-pressure (1/3 atm. or 30 kPa) through MCP, or directly applying the pressure to the skin, or body.

    Esther Dyson: Flight School: the NASA report

  • It only changes in increments of .03 kPa or less in a 15-minute interval, and the weather data is only measured in .01 kPa increments.

    On headaches

  • Atmospheric pressure at sea level is equal to 101.3 kPa.

    Pressure

  • The equivalence of its partial pressure in Kilopascals is: 0.00034 atm*m = 0.0344505 kPa.

    Unthreaded #19 « Climate Audit

  • Scientists often use the kilopascal (kPa) as their preferred unit for measuring pressure. 1 kilopascal is equal to 10 millibars.

    Atmospheric pressure

  • Such waves were said to consist of an almost vertical wall of water preceded by a trough so deep that it was referred to as a "hole in the sea"; a ship encountering a wave of such magnitude would be unlikely to survive the tremendous pressures of up to 100 tonnes/m2 980 kPa exerted by the weight of the breaking water, and would almost certainly be sunk in a matter of seconds.

    The Speculist: Rogue Waves

  • Usual ship design allows for rounded storm waves up to 15 m and pressures around 15 tonnes/m2 147 kPa without damage, and up to twice that if some deformation is allowed for, which is about a wave of twenty metres.

    The Speculist: Rogue Waves

  • When two rods of graphite are heated to a high temperature by an electric arc discharge in an atmosphere of helium at a pressure of 13 kPa the graphite rods are slowly consumed and soot is formed.

    The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1996

  • Where P = 101.3 kPa (normal barometric pressure at sea level), and

    Chapter 7

  • (35°C or 308°K) and normal pressure (P = 101.325 kPa) is 0.9 m³.

    Chapter 7

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