Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The position of a keeper; guardianship, ownership.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The office or position of a keeper.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The office of a keeper.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From keeper +‎ -ship.

Examples

  • A single Aramite, definitely a keepership guard as far as the drake was able to tell, kept an eye out for any intruders.

    LEGENDS OF THE DRAGONREALM

  • Most looked like members of the keepership guard, but there were two keepers as well, one of whom, much younger than the Gryphon would have expected, was evidently in charge.

    LEGENDS OF THE DRAGONREALM

  • The keepership was semireligious, being connected so deeply with the Ravager.

    LEGENDS OF THE DRAGONREALM

  • He looked down and noticed that the crystal no longer glowed with the power of the keepership.

    LEGENDS OF THE DRAGONREALM

  • Imagine my surprise to quickly discover that, in exchange for a measure of power, they were all too willing to tell me about your own deal with my counterpart in the keepership.

    LEGENDS OF THE DRAGONREALM

  • Perhaps his news was worth hearing before he sent the boy down to the cells for a few days of …tutoring in the rules of the keepership.

    LEGENDS OF THE DRAGONREALM

  • They were still outnumbered in close quarters, with no weapons but their claws and their sorcery still suppressed by the power of the keepership in general.

    LEGENDS OF THE DRAGONREALM

  • Nicholas, an eminent lawyer of England in the reign of Queen Mary, succeeded, when Elizabeth ascended the throne, to the lord-keepership of the great seal.

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science Volume 11, No. 24, March, 1873

  • ADAMS and a book-keepership in dry goods; and was ultimately blurred into BLADAMS and employment as a copyist by Mr. DIBBLE, to whom his experience of spending every cent he had in the world, and getting nothing in the world for it but wrinkles, seemed felicitously legal and almost supernaturally qualifying for law-writing.

    Punchinello, Volume 1, No. 16, July 16, 1870

  • A beautiful brook, to the perennial flow of whose waters the abundant water-cresses testified, which is a very rare thing in an Aegean scene, meandered amongst mingled sycamores and olives, and gave freshness to glades where the sheep fed under the keepership of the antique-mannered shepherd lads and lasses; and in the opening of the bordering trees we saw the far-off and arid mountains, rugged and picturesque peaks.

    The Autobiography of a Journalist

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