Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of killdeer.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I can hear the killdeers across the street, and this morning the most melodious singing got me out of bed in time to see the male goldfinch take a nip of seed and fly away.

    Birds

  • Some birds, such as willets, killdeers, and oystercatchers, stay during the summer along with the ever-present gulls, which you can find all year long.

    The Field Guide to Wildlife Habitats of the Eastern United States

  • I saw killdeers frozen to death the third day of that month.

    Old Rail Fence Corners The A. B. C's. of Minnesota History

  • He dashed to the river bank and told the killdeers, and then visited the underbrush and informed the thrushes and wood robins.

    The Song of the Cardinal

  • They's some birds like killdeers an 'bobwhites' at can make things pretty plain, but I never heard a bird 'at could jest speak words out clear an' distinct like that fellow.

    The Song of the Cardinal

  • I could hear the roosters in the barnyard, the turkey gobbler, and the old ganders screamed once in a while, and sometimes a bird sang a skimpy little fall song; nothing like spring, except the killdeers and larks; they were always good to hear -- and then the dinner bell rang.

    Laddie: A True Blue Story

  • "Surely you heard the killdeers crying in the night," prompted the man.

    The Harvester

  • The red-wings were swarming, the killdeers busy, and he thought of the Dream Girl and smiled.

    The Harvester

  • Among the growth of the lake shore, duck, coot, and grebe voices commingled in the last chattering hastened splash of securing supper before bedtime; crying killdeers crossed the water, and overhead the nighthawks massed in circling companies.

    The Harvester

  • The meadow-larks and the killdeers came back; the gophers chattered.

    A Prairie Borgia

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