Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of killjoy.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • According to The Sun, Palace "killjoys" have decreed that tea towels commemorating next year's royal wedding would not be "in good taste."

    NEWS.com.au | Top Stories

  • Sanchez goes on to suggest the city of Houston build a parking lot for club-goers, that the cops patrolling the street not be "killjoys", and that a management district be created for …

    Lone Star Times

  • A lot of times, in the 1920s, in the Prohibition era and the women behind the temperance movement are sort of depicted as a bunch of killjoys and party poopers, and, you know, they want to prevent people from having a good time.

    Down On The 'Boardwalk' With Terence Winter

  • I've reduced the posted story to just an excerpt; I was going back and forth about it, but enough well-meaning killjoys in the comments pointed out that as a copyrighted story, there were issues in posting it all online, especially since the donation I suggested went to the homeless shelter as opposed to the author directly, who is still unreachable.

    Boing Boing

  • However, as Conservative-studded as it was, the list of British dignitaries was not the controversial one: I know it's déclassé to mention it, and they disinvited Syria, and is that not enough for you human-rights-abuse killjoys?

    Royal wedding guest list: perplexing – and where was naughty Uncle Gary?

  • A lot of times, in the 1920s, in the Prohibition era and the women behind the temperance movement are sort of depicted as a bunch of killjoys and party poopers, and, you know, they want to prevent people from having a good time.

    Down On The 'Boardwalk' With Terence Winter

  • * A british expression that they should really be ashamed of using. guest jesus.killjoys. only the sceptics on today then?

    VOTD: Spaced Slow-Mo Finger Gunfight Flashmob in London | /Film

  • A lot of times, in the 1920s, in the Prohibition era and the women behind the temperance movement are sort of depicted as a bunch of killjoys and party poopers, and, you know, they want to prevent people from having a good time.

    Down On The 'Boardwalk' With Terence Winter

  • It would have taken courage: in those days Tony Blair still had a little gloss left on him and we did not want to sound like killjoys.

    The London Olympics are the new Millennium Dome

  • A lot of times, in the 1920s, in the Prohibition era and the women behind the temperance movement are sort of depicted as a bunch of killjoys and party poopers, and, you know, they want to prevent people from having a good time.

    Down On The 'Boardwalk' With Terence Winter

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.