Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A drongo-shrike of the genus Dicrurus, as the Indian finga, D. macrocercus, remarkable for its elongated forked tail and for the courage and address with which, like the king-bird of the United States, it attacks other birds. The term is extended to various other drongos of the family Dieruridæ.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Several species of drongo or king-crow occur on the Nilgiris, but not one of them is sufficiently abundant to be numbered among the common birds of the hill stations.

    Birds of the Indian Hills

  • It is like the common king-crow in appearance, but the plumage is glossed with a bronze sheen, and the tail is less markedly forked.

    Birds of the Indian Hills

  • Finn found that it was not deceived by the resemblance between an edible and an unpalatable Indian swallow-tailed butterfly, although the sharp king-crow was deceived by the likeness.

    Birds of the Indian Hills

  • The king-crow is about the size of a bulbul, but he has a tail 6 or 7 inches long, which is gracefully forked.

    Birds of the Indian Hills

  • The famous black drongo or king-crow (_Dicrurus ater_) is the type of this well-marked family of passerine birds.

    Birds of the Indian Hills

  • Among the latter the most prominent are the grey-necked crow, the koel, the myna, the king-crow and the magpie-robin.

    Birds of the Indian Hills

  • The handsome _Bhimraj_ or larger racket-tailed drongo (_Dissemurus paradiseus_), a glorified king-crow with a tail fully 20 inches in length, is a Himalayan bird, but he dwells far from the madding crowd, and is not likely to be seen at any hill station except as a captive.

    Birds of the Indian Hills

  • The latter looks like a king-crow with an unusually long tail,

    Birds of the Indian Hills

  • The note of the ashy drongo differs considerably from that of the king-crow: otherwise the habits of the two species are very similar.

    Birds of the Indian Hills

  • Take thirty-three per cent. off the pugnacity of the king-crow and you will arrive at a fair estimate of that of the ashy drongo.

    Birds of the Indian Hills

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