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Examples

  • Shredded SecurityOverdraft practices drain fees from older Americans (PDF) [Center For Responsible Lending via CL&P Blog] (Photo: michael. kinne)

    Overdraft Fees Are Trapping Consumers On Social Security In A Cycle Of Debt - The Consumerist

  • Each of them was very affable and well conditioned, and walked abroad (for their greater comfort in such a time of tribulation) to try if they could meete with their fayre friends, who (happily) might all three be among these seaven, and the rest kinne unto them in one degree or other.

    The Decameron

  • _Fellowes, and friends and kinne forsooke me quite.

    The Arte of English Poesie

  • The possession and inheritance of landed property was regulated by the law called gavelkind (gavail-kinne), an ancient Celtic institution, but common to Britons, Anglo-Saxons, and others.

    An Illustrated History of Ireland from AD 400 to 1800

  • Come, Cathleen, astore (i.e. my dear), begin; no apologies to the cean-kinne. '

    Waverley — Volume 1

  • He commaundeth vs to circumcifethe and '5*o. vncitcumcifed f kinne of our heartc: and by Mofcs he declareih that

    The institution of christian religion

  • Come, Cathleen, astore (i.e. my dear), begin; no apologies to the cean-kinne.’

    Waverley

  • Trouasti &c. And that such account hath bene alwayes made of Poetes, aswell sheweth this that the worthy Scipio in all his warres against Carthage and Numantia had euermore in his company, and that in a most familiar sort the goode olde Poete Ennius: as also that Alexander destroying Thebes, when he was enformed that the famous Lyrick Poet Pindarus was borne in that citie, not onely commaunded streightly, that no man should vpon payne of death do any violence to that house by fire or otherwise: but also specially spared most, and some highly rewarded, that were of hys kinne.

    Shepheardes Calendar

  • 3141: Sir Iohn, thy tender Lamb-kinne, now is King,

    Henry IV, Part Two (1623 First Folio Edition)

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